Book Medieval Crossover

    Book Details:
  • Author : Barbara Newman
  • Publisher : University of Notre Dame Pess
  • Release : 2013-05-15
  • ISBN : 0268161402
  • Pages : 416 pages

Download or read Medieval Crossover PDF, written by Barbara Newman and published by University of Notre Dame Pess. This book was released on 2013-05-15 with total page 416 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The sacred and the secular in medieval literature have too often been perceived as opposites, or else relegated to separate but unequal spheres. In Medieval Crossover: Reading the Secular against the Sacred, Barbara Newman offers a new approach to the many ways that sacred and secular interact in medieval literature, arguing that (in contrast to our own cultural situation) the sacred was the normative, unmarked default category against which the secular always had to define itself and establish its niche. Newman refers to this dialectical relationship as "crossover"—which is not a genre in itself, but a mode of interaction, an openness to the meeting or even merger of sacred and secular in a wide variety of forms. Newman sketches a few of the principles that shape their interaction: the hermeneutics of "both/and," the principle of double judgment, the confluence of pagan material and Christian meaning in Arthurian romance, the rule of convergent idealism in hagiographic romance, and the double-edged sword in parody. Medieval Crossover explores a wealth of case studies in French, English, and Latin texts that concentrate on instances of paradox, collision, and convergence. Newman convincingly and with great clarity demonstrates the widespread applicability of the crossover concept as an analytical tool, examining some very disparate works. These include French and English romances about Lancelot and the Grail; the mystical writing of Marguerite Porete (placed in the context of lay spirituality, lyric traditions, and the Romance of the Rose); multiple examples of parody (sexually obscene, shockingly anti-Semitic, or cleverly litigious); and René of Anjou's two allegorical dream visions. Some of these texts are scarcely known to medievalists; others are rarely studied together. Newman's originality in her choice of these primary works will inspire new questions and set in motion new fields of exploration for medievalists working in a large variety of disciplines, including literature, religious studies, history, and cultural studies.

Book Women Readers and Writers in Medieval Iberia

Download or read Women Readers and Writers in Medieval Iberia PDF, written by Montserrat Piera and published by BRILL. This book was released on 2019-08-05 with total page 507 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: A study of the cultural practices and paradigms of reading and textual composition among medieval Iberian women readers and writers (specifically Violant of Bar, Leonor López de Córdoba, Constanza de Castilla, Teresa de Cartagena and Isabel de Villena).

Book Reading Women in Late Medieval Europe

Download or read Reading Women in Late Medieval Europe PDF, written by Alfred Thomas and published by Springer. This book was released on 2016-04-29 with total page 251 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Although Chaucer is typically labeled as the "Father of English Literature," evidence shows that his work appealed to Europe and specifically European women. Rereading the Canterbury Tales , Thomas argues that Chaucer imagined Anne of Bohemia, wife of famed Richard II, as an ideal reader, an aspect that came to greatly affect his writing.

Book Medieval Crossover

    Book Details:
  • Author : Barbara Newman
  • Publisher :
  • Release : 2022-09-30
  • ISBN : 9780268206574
  • Pages : 0 pages

Download or read Medieval Crossover PDF, written by Barbara Newman and published by . This book was released on 2022-09-30 with total page 0 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Newman highlights the ways in which the premodern reader understood sacred and secular not as opposing points but as a state of double judgment.

Book Shakespeare  Catholicism  and the Middle Ages

Download or read Shakespeare Catholicism and the Middle Ages PDF, written by Alfred Thomas and published by Springer. This book was released on 2018-06-18 with total page 260 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Whereas traditional scholarship assumed that William Shakespeare used the medieval past as a negative foil to legitimate the present, Shakespeare, Catholicism, and the Middle Ages offers a revisionist perspective, arguing that the playwright valorizes the Middle Ages in order to critique the oppressive nature of the Tudor-Stuart state. In examining Shakespeare’s Richard II, The Merchant of Venice, Hamlet, King Lear, Macbeth, and The Winter’s Tale, the text explores how Shakespeare repossessed the medieval past to articulate political and religious dissent. By comparing these and other plays by Shakespeare’s contemporaries with their medieval analogues, Alfred Thomas argues that Shakespeare was an ecumenical writer concerned with promoting tolerance in a highly intolerant and partisan age.

Book Jews in Medieval England

    Book Details:
  • Author : Miriamne Ara Krummel
  • Publisher : Springer
  • Release : 2018-01-08
  • ISBN : 3319637487
  • Pages : 373 pages

Download or read Jews in Medieval England PDF, written by Miriamne Ara Krummel and published by Springer. This book was released on 2018-01-08 with total page 373 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This volume examines the teaching of Jewishness within the context of medieval England. It covers a wide array of academic disciplines and addresses a multitude of primary sources, including medieval English manuscripts, law codes, philosophy, art, and literature, in explicating how the Jew-as-Other was formed. Chapters are devoted to the teaching of the complexities of medieval Jewish experiences in the modern classroom. Jews in Medieval England: Teaching Representations of the Other also grounds medieval conceptions of the Other within the contemporary world where we continue to confront the problematic attitudes directed toward alleged social outcasts.

Book The Medieval Roots of Antisemitism

Download or read The Medieval Roots of Antisemitism PDF, written by Jonathan Adams and published by Routledge. This book was released on 2018-01-31 with total page 474 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: This book presents a fresh approach to the question of the historical continuities and discontinuities of Jew-hatred, juxtaposing chapters dealing with the same phenomenon – one in the pre-modern, one in the modern period. How do the circumstances of interreligious violence differ in pre-Reformation Europe, the modern Muslim world, and the modern Western world? In addition to the diachronic comparison, most chapters deal with the significance of religion for the formation of anti-Jewish stereotypes. The direct dialogue of small-scale studies bridging the chronological gap brings out important nuances: anti-Zionist texts appropriating medieval ritual murder accusations; modern-day pogroms triggered by contemporary events but fuelled by medieval prejudices; and contemporary stickers drawing upon long-inherited knowledge about what a "Jew" looks like. These interconnections, however, differ from the often-assumed straightforward continuities between medieval and modern anti-Jewish hatred. The book brings together many of the most distinguished scholars of this field, creating a unique dialogue between historical periods and academic disciplines.

Book Gender and Exemplarity in Medieval and Early Modern Spain

Download or read Gender and Exemplarity in Medieval and Early Modern Spain PDF, written by and published by BRILL. This book was released on 2020-09-07 with total page 310 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Gender and Exemplarity in Medieval and Early Modern Spain gathers a series of studies on the interplay between gender, sanctity and exemplarity in regard to literary production in the Iberian Peninsula.

Book The Unspeakable  Gender and Sexuality in Medieval Literature  1000 1400

Download or read The Unspeakable Gender and Sexuality in Medieval Literature 1000 1400 PDF, written by Victoria Blud and published by Boydell & Brewer. This book was released on 2017 with total page 224 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: An investigation of the motif of the unspeakable as manifested in a wide range of medieval texts, from the Exeter Book to Chaucer.

Book The Medieval Postcolonial Jew  In and Out of Time

Download or read The Medieval Postcolonial Jew In and Out of Time PDF, written by Miriamne Ara Krummel and published by University of Michigan Press. This book was released on 2022-04-05 with total page 285 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Introduction: Calculating Time: Eosturmonath, Nisan, and the Paschal Table -- Just In Time: Sacrificial Gifts, Rotting Corpses, and Annus Domini -- An (Un)Common Era: Passionate Narratives, Temporal Clashes-Jewish and Christian -- Taking Jews out and Putting Them Back in: Christian Chronometry, the York Massacre, and a Cycle of Mystery Plays -- A Time of Many Layers: Feasting on the Temporalities of The Siege of Jerusalem -- Repressing a Perpetually Resurfacing Temporality: Four Authorial Orphans and The Fifteenth-Century 'Tale of the Litel Clergeon and the Jews' -- Epilogue: The Empire of Common Time.

Book The Beguines of Medieval Paris

    Book Details:
  • Author : Tanya Stabler Miller
  • Publisher : University of Pennsylvania Press
  • Release : 2014-03-20
  • ISBN : 0812209680
  • Pages : 304 pages

Download or read The Beguines of Medieval Paris PDF, written by Tanya Stabler Miller and published by University of Pennsylvania Press. This book was released on 2014-03-20 with total page 304 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: In the thirteenth century, Paris was the largest city in Western Europe, the royal capital of France, and the seat of one of Europe's most important universities. In this vibrant and cosmopolitan city, the beguines, women who wished to devote their lives to Christian ideals without taking formal vows, enjoyed a level of patronage and esteem that was uncommon among like communities elsewhere. Some Parisian beguines owned shops and played a vital role in the city's textile industry and economy. French royals and nobles financially supported the beguinages, and university clerics looked to the beguines for inspiration in their pedagogical endeavors. The Beguines of Medieval Paris examines these religious communities and their direct participation in the city's commercial, intellectual, and religious life. Drawing on an array of sources, including sermons, religious literature, tax rolls, and royal account books, Tanya Stabler Miller contextualizes the history of Parisian beguines within a spectrum of lay religious activity and theological controversy. She examines the impact of women on the construction of medieval clerical identity, the valuation of women's voices and activities, and the surprising ways in which local networks and legal structures permitted women to continue to identify as beguines long after a church council prohibited the beguine status. Based on intensive archival research, The Beguines of Medieval Paris makes an original contribution to the history of female religiosity and labor, university politics and intellectual debates, royal piety, and the central place of Paris in the commerce and culture of medieval Europe.

Book Medieval Badges

    Book Details:
  • Author : Ann Marie Rasmussen
  • Publisher : University of Pennsylvania Press
  • Release : 2021-09-10
  • ISBN : 081229968X
  • Pages : 312 pages

Download or read Medieval Badges PDF, written by Ann Marie Rasmussen and published by University of Pennsylvania Press. This book was released on 2021-09-10 with total page 312 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Mass-produced of tin-lead alloys and cheap to make and purchase, medieval badges were brooch-like objects displaying familiar images. Circulating widely throughout Europe in the High and late Middle Ages, badges were usually small, around four-by-four centimeters, though examples as tiny as two centimeters and a few as large as ten centimeters have been found. About 75 percent of surviving badges are closely associated with specific charismatic or holy sites, and when sewn or pinned onto clothing or a hat, they would have marked their wearers as having successfully completed a pilgrimage. Many others, however, were artifacts of secular life; some were political devices—a swan, a stag, a rose—that would have denoted membership in a civic organization or an elite family, and others—a garland, a pair of clasped hands, a crowned heart—that would have been tokens of love or friendship. A good number are enigmatic and even obscene. The popularity of badges seems to have grown steadily from the last decades of the twelfth century before waning at the very end of the fifteenth century. Some 20,000 badges survive today, though historians estimate that as many as two million were produced in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries alone. Archaeologists and hobbyists alike continue to make new finds, often along muddy riverbanks in northern Europe. Interdisciplinary in approach, and sumptuously illustrated with more than 115 color and black-and-white images, Medieval Badges introduces badges in all their variety and uses. Ann Marie Rasmussen considers all medieval badges, whether they originated in religious or secular contexts, and highlights the different ways badges could confer meaning and identity on their wearers. Drawing on evidence from England, France, the Low Countries, Germany, and Scandinavia, this book provides information about the manufacture, preservation, and scholarly study of these artifacts. From chapters exploring badges and pilgrimage, to the complexities of the political use of badges, to the ways the visual meaning-making strategies of badges were especially well-suited to the unique features of medieval cities, this book offers an expansive introduction of these medieval objects for a wide readership.

Book The Secret in Medieval Literature

    Book Details:
  • Author : Albrecht Classen
  • Publisher : Rowman & Littlefield
  • Release : 2022-11-15
  • ISBN : 1666917877
  • Pages : 295 pages

Download or read The Secret in Medieval Literature PDF, written by Albrecht Classen and published by Rowman & Littlefield. This book was released on 2022-11-15 with total page 295 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: The Secret in Medieval Literature explores the many secret agents, actions, creatures, and other beings influencing human existence. Medieval poets had a clear sense of the alternative dimension (the secret) and allowed it to enter quite frequently into their texts.

Book The Enclosed Garden and the Medieval Religious Imaginary

Download or read The Enclosed Garden and the Medieval Religious Imaginary PDF, written by Liz Herbert McAvoy and published by Boydell & Brewer. This book was released on 2021 with total page 408 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: During the Middle Ages, the arresting motif of the walled garden - especially in its manifestation as a sacred or love-inflected hortus conclusus - was a common literary device. Usually associated with the Virgin Mary or the Lady of popular romance, it appeared in myriad literary and iconographic forms, largely for its aesthetic, decorative and symbolic qualities. This study focuses on the more complex metaphysical functions and meanings attached to it between 1100 and 1400 - and, in particular, those associated with the gardens of Eden and the Song of Songs. Drawing on contemporary theories of gender, gardens, landscape and space, it traces specifically the resurfacing and reworking of the idea and image of the enclosed garden within the writings of medieval holy women and other female-coded texts. In so doing, it presents the enclosed garden as generator of a powerfully gendered hermeneutic imprint within the medieval religious imaginary - indeed, as an alternative "language" used to articulate those highly complex female-coded approaches to God that came to dominate late-medieval religiosity. The book also responds to the "eco-turn" in our own troubled times that attempts to return the non-human to the centre of public and private discourse. The texts under scrutiny therefore invite responses as both literary and "garden" spaces where form often reflects content, and where their authors are also diligent "gardeners" the apocryphal Lives of Adam and Eve, for example; the horticulturally-inflected Hortus Deliciarum of Herrad of Hohenburg and the "green" philosophies of Hildegard of Bingen's Scivias; the visionary writings of Gertrude the Great and Mechthild of Hackeborn collaborating within their Helfta nunnery; the Middle English poem, Pearl; and multiple reworkings of the deeply problematic and increasingly sexualized garden enclosing the biblical figure of Susanna.

Book The Face and Faciality in Medieval French Literature  1170 1390

Download or read The Face and Faciality in Medieval French Literature 1170 1390 PDF, written by Alice Hazard and published by Boydell & Brewer. This book was released on 2021 with total page 242 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Modern theoretical approaches throw new light on the concepts of face and faciality in the Roman de la Rose and other French texts from the Middle Ages.

Book Samson and Delilah in Medieval Insular French

Download or read Samson and Delilah in Medieval Insular French PDF, written by Catherine Léglu and published by Springer. This book was released on 2018-08-24 with total page 126 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Samson and Delilah in Medieval Insular French investigates several different adaptations of the story of Samson that enabled it to move from a strictly religious sphere into vernacular and secular artworks. Catherine Léglu explores the narrative’s translation into French in medieval England, examining the multiple versions of the Samson narrative via its many adaptations into verse, prose, visual art and musical. Utilizing a multidisciplinary approach, this text draws together examples from several genres and media, focusing on the importance of book learning to secular works. In analysing this Biblical narrative, Léglu reveals the importance of the Samson and Delilah story as a point of entry into a fuller understanding of medieval translations and adaptations of the Bible.

Book Demonic Possession and Lived Religion in Later Medieval Europe

Download or read Demonic Possession and Lived Religion in Later Medieval Europe PDF, written by Sari Katajala-Peltomaa and published by Oxford University Press, USA. This book was released on 2020-03-04 with total page 222 pages. Available in PDF, EPUB and Kindle. Book excerpt: Demonic possession was a spiritual state that often had physical symptoms; however, in Demonic Possession and Lived Religion in Later Medieval Europe, Sari Katajala-Peltomaa argues that demonic possession was a social phenomenon which should be understood with regard to the community and culture. She focuses on significant case studies from canonization processes (c. 1240-1450) which show how each set of sources formed its own specific context, in which demonic presence derived from different motivations, reasonings, and methods of categorization. The chosen perspective is that of lived religion, which is both a thematic approach and a methodology: a focus on rituals, symbols, and gestures, as well as sensitivity to nuances and careful contextualizing of the cases are constitutive elements of the argumentation. The analysis contests the hierarchy between the 'learned' and the 'popular' within religion, as well as the existence of a strict polarity between individual and collective religious participation. Demonic presence disclosed negotiations over authority and agency; it shows how the personal affected the communal, and vice versa, and how they were eventually transformed into discourses and institutions of the Church; that is, definitions of the miraculous and the diabolical. Geographically, the volume covers Western Europe, comparing Northern and Southern material and customs. The structure follows the logic of the phenomenon, beginning with the background reasons offered as a cause of demonic possession, continuing with communities' responses and emotions, including construction of sacred caregiving methods. Finally, the ways in which demonic presence contributed to wider societal debates in the fields of politics and spirituality are discussed. Alterity and inversion of identity, gender, and various forms of corporeality and the interplay between the sacred and diabolical are themes that run all through the volume.